My problem with traditional desi marriage

Love, InshAllah

Eds. Note: This is a response to yesterday’s guest post, How I met my son’s mother. Have a perspective to share on love and relationships? Read our guidelines, here.

Update 11/26/13: Congratulations to writer Aisha Saeed on this post being chosen by the editors of WordPress for Freshly Pressed, highlighting the best posts on WordPress. In an email to LoveinshAllah.com, WordPress said: “Aisha Saeed’s response to your guest post about arranged marriages was a really powerful and articulate call for fairness and equality. She delivers her points with a great balance of passion and reason, which makes this piece engaging even for those who aren’t intimate with the debate surrounding marriage in south Asian communities. It’s a great post that deserves a wider audience.”

aisha

 

There’s a befuddling conundrum afoot in the desi (South Asian) community. You must first understand a few things:

a) For whatever reason…

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A Beautiful Journey

Image

Happily married in love
A vision remained in their young minds

Life foreseen and well planned
Twist and turns they survived

Overjoyed by young ones
Brought them up with love and warmth

Tiny toys and dresses they played
With little feet they cherished

Surprises and mysteries they perceived
Lots of realisations they retrieved

Young ones grew and new relations made
New path of joy was now laid

Making merry singing with their grand kids
Forgetting the pain they had on their hips

Finally saw their race had ended
For money and power they had secured

Thrilled they were,starting life together
Holding hands,they pray for peaceful end together

Teen entrepreneur Avani Singh: “You can make a difference”

TED Blog

New Delhi’s streets are epic — trucks, cars, cows and, especially, bicycle rickshaws, three-wheeled carriers that can zip through traffic, pedaled by a very, very hard-working driver. Growing up in New Delhi, Avani Singh passed them every day on her way to school. And her route also passed the city’s slums. In this city of 17 million, the New Delhi slums are zones of poverty that stretch for miles. To Avani as a young girl, they seemed just a part of the city, always there, unchanging. But as she grew older, it began to dawn on her: Not everyone had what she had. And she could help.

Meanwhile, she learned in the news about a new kind of bicycle rickshaw. Bright green and super futuristic, it was electric-powered, thanks to a solar panel on the roof. Which made it easier to pedal. Avani, then only 16 years old, had the…

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